Weight Bias & Stigma > Tools for Researchers

Part of our mission is to support the work of researchers investigating weight bias. Below, we provide relevant information on self-report measures that may be useful in studies assessing weight bias and stigma.

WHERE TO FIND INFORMATION ON SELF-REPORT MEASURES OF WEIGHT BIAS

There are several published reviews of self-report measures to assess weight bias. These provide relevant information for researchers considering what measures to use to study weight-biased attitudes.

Lacroix, E., Alberga A., Russell-Matthew, S., McLaren, L., & von Ranson, K. (2017). Weight bias: A systematic review of characteristics and psychometric properties of self-report questionnaires. Obesity Facts, 10, 223-237. DOI: 10.1159/000475716

DePierre, J. A., & Puhl, R. M. (2012). Experiences of weight stigmatization: A review of self-report assessment measures. Obesity Facts, 5(6), 897-918. DOI: 10.1159/000346259

Ruggs, E.N., King, E.B., Hebl, M., Fitzsimmons, M. (2010). Assessment of weight stigma. Obesity Facts, 3, 60–69. DOI: 10.1159/000273208

MEASURING IMPLICIT WEIGHT BIAS
THE IMPLICIT ASSOCIATION TEST (IAT)

The Implicit Associations Test is a timed, word categorization task that can be useful both in research and educational/training presentations. The tests are designed to measure implicit attitudes toward socially stigmatized groups.  A detailed description of the IAT can be found here. Many research publications have used this measure to study weight bias (for example, see Teachman & Brownell, 2001).

The following versions of the Weight IAT can be used to assess implicit weight biases:  

Instructions for Administering the IAT can be found here

If you would like to take the Weight Implicit Association Test, go to Project Implicit at https://implicit.harvard.edu/implicit. Register for the Project Implicit Social Attitudes tests, and click on Weight IAT.

If you have additional questions about measurement of weight bias, please contact us with your question, and we will do our best to help. Please note that we do not provide permissions for use of measures – you must contact the author of the original measure to request permission.